TFL (Transport for London)

TFL Head Office Contact Numbers

TFL Phone Number
Head Office 0843 557 3455
Payment Disputes 0843 557 3455
Customer Services 0843 557 3455
Oyster Card Helpline 0843 208 4501

TFL Head Office Contact Line Opening Hours

Department Opening Hours
Head Office 8am-5.30pm, weekdays

TFL Head Office Address

Department Address
UK Head Office Ashfield House
7 Beaumont Avenue
West Kensington
London, W14 9UY

Why would I need to call the TFL head office contact number?

As Transport for London runs the vast majority of transportation systems in the Greater London Area, including the London Underground, Overground Railway, Bus Services, Tram Services, Monorail and Overhead Railway, you may need to call them for any number of reasons. For example, it’s possible that you’ll simply be calling the Transport for London head office contact number to look for information on a service or a number of services, to look into the routes needed to get from Point A to Point B, or to get information on pricing of fares and the possible changes in pricing.

You may need to call for more pressing reasons, such as the search for a refund on a service, to register a complaint against a staff member, a service or a policy employed by TFL, to dispute your ejection for drunkenness, to dispute a fine levied against you or to capitulate and pay the fine, signifying your submission.

You may also need to call for reasons unrelated to conflict with TFL, such as to get help with your route planning or to snitch on someone for drinking alcoholic beverages on a TFL service or in a Transport for London station. You may also need to call to report a terror attack which has claimed the lives of dozens of innocent people.

Your reasons to call the Transport for London head office are potentially infinite, of course – they certainly aren’t restricted to the possibilities expunged above. As a brief list of possible reasons why you may want to call, you can reference the points below, but please, whatever you do; don’t consider the list exhaustive. It is but a guideline to get the mind working.

A non-exhaustive list of reasons why you may need to call the Transport for London head office contact number:

  • To get information pertaining to Transport for London
  • To make an enquiry as to fare pricing
  • To make an enquiry as to fare increases
  • To enquire about travel timetables
  • To make an enquiry pertaining to travel arrangements
  • To register a complaint about Transport for London
  • To make a complaint about Transport for London staff or services
  • To report a suspicious individual
  • To report an unattended item
  • To report someone for drinking alcohol on the TFL network
  • To arrange tickets
  • For help with planning a route
  • To register your outrage at yet another strike
  • To register your outrage at the need for yet another strike due to worker’s conditions
  • To dispute a fine
  • To pay a fine
  • To dispute a charge made to your Oyster card
  • To complain about the prices these days

Transport for London

TFL was put together in 2000, as the direct result of the passing of the Greater London Authority Act of 1999 by the Houses of Parliament and Lords. Succeeding London Regional Transport as the authority in charge of London’s transport network, the system did not take over control of the London Underground until 2003, with the passing of the controversial “PPP” or “Public Private Partnership” deal. Before that point, the Tube had actually been the jurisdiction of the Metropolitan Police.

TFL is always chaired by the Mayor of London, and its first chairman was Ken Livingstone, who was succeeded by Boris Johnson for the role in 2008.

Deputies of TFL in this timeframe include Dave Wetzel and Daniel Moylan, appointed by their respective chairs.

Transport for London operates a centralised archive in which all of its records are protected, and as a central transport authority, these records also include the full business records of the predecessors of Transport for London, such as London Regional Transport. Earlier records and records pertaining to other authorities are held in situ at the London Metropolitan Archives by TFL on their behalf.

As the result of the 7/7 bombings in 2005, many TFL staff were awarded honours for their bravery and compassion – pulling survivors from the scenes, recovering the dead, getting the area clear for emergency services access and protecting the public as best they could. For that, they were awarded a spot on the 2006  New Year Honours List, with organisational figures such as Peter Hendy and Tim O’Toole being awarded CBEs. Other members of TFL who were distinguished in the ceremony included David Boyce, John Boyle, Peter Sanders, Alan Dell, and John Gardner, who ranked everywhere between train drivers and major management officials of the Underground, Overground, Transit and Rail systems. All of them received MBEs for their actions on 7/7.

In 2008, TFL took the unprecedented step of banning the consumption of alcohol on Tube services, Overground services, London Buses, Tram services, the Docklands Railway Service and every Transport for London Station or Outpost in operation. Stations run by other rail companies could continue to allow the consumption of alcoholic beverages if they wanted. In addition to this, the service banned individuals from carrying open containers of alcohol, but permitted the easy carriage of sealed containers like closed cans or bottles with the tops still on. The ban was proposed to promote the comfort and safety of all Tube passengers and all passengers of public transport in the Greater London Area, and does so by refusing travel to those who are in defiance of its ordinances and carrying legal weight for their expulsion from the premises. So far, it has been effective – TFL is reporting assaults on its staff decreased by 15% after the rules came into force.

The night before the new law came into effect, there was a huge party on all the Underground Lines, the “Last Round on the Underground.”

In 2014, at the centennial of the First World War, TFL celebrated its 100 Years of Women In Transport event, launched in association with Crossrail, The DfT, Network Rail, The WTS (Women’s Transportation Seminar) and Women’s Engineering Society. The campaign aims to celebrate and highlight the critically important work performed by women in the transportation industry, beginning in the First World War, when hundreds of thousands of women entered the transportation industry in order to preserve it during the staff shortages caused by enlistment and the industrial-scale slaughter of the working male population, a slaughter which was so appalling that the conflict became known as “The Great War” and “The War to End All Wars”. How wrong they were; no carnage is too great for humanity. No amount of bloodletting will ever quench man’s murderous thirst. But that’s a subject for another head office contact number page. Maybe NATO.

TFL Office Locations and Addresses

Albany House
Petty France,

London,

SW1H 9EA

Ashfield House
7 Beaumont Avenue
West Kensington
London, W14 9UY

210 – 212 Baker Street
London
NW1 5RT

216 Baker Street
London
NW1 5RT

Baker Street Complex 
covering:
13 Allsop Place,
15/17 Allsop Place,
Selbie House

Bonhill Street

15 Bonhill Street,

London

EC2A 4DL

55 Broadway (Complex)
55 Broadway,
London,
SW1H 0BD

172 Buckingham Palace Road
London
SW1W 9TN

200 Buckingham Palace Road
London
SW1W 9TA
Cranbourn Street
20 Cranbourn Street,
London,
WC2H 7AA 

84 Eccleston Square
London
SW1V 1PX

Bakerloo Chambers,

304 Edgware Road,

London W2 1DY.

Faith Lawson House
15  – 17 Dacre Street
London
SW1H 0DJ

Griffin Rooms
49 Pelham Street, London, SW7 2NJ

Griffith House
280 Old Marylebone Road
London
NW1 5RJ

Kings Buildings
16, Smith Square
London,
SW1P 3HQ

Lost Property Office
200 Baker Street
London
NW1 5RZ

London Transport Museum
39 Wellington Street
London, WC2E 7BB

L T Museum Collection Centre
118 – 120 Gunnersbury Lane, Acton
London, W3 9BQ

Old Broad Street

70 Old Broad Street,

London,

EC2M 1QS

Palestra

197 Blackfriars Road
Southwark London
SE1 8NJ

Parnell House
2nd – 6th Floors,

25 Wilton Road
London,

SW1V 1LW

Pelham Street
63 – 81 Pelham Street
London
SW7 2NJ

Pier Walk

14 Pier Walk,

London

SE10 0ES

Premier House

313, Kilburn Lane,

London,

W9 3EG

Public Carriage Office
15 Penton St,
London,
N1 9PU

Townsend House
Greycoat Place
London, SW1P 1BL

United Kingdom House
180 Oxford Street
London
W1D 1NN

Victoria Station House
191, Victoria Street
London
SW1E 5NE

LT Museum Offices
35 Wellington Street,
London, test
WC2E 7BN

Western House
237 – 239 Oxford Street
London
W1R 1AB

Windsor House Complex
42 – 50 Victoria Street
London
SW1H 0TL

TFL Fare Increases

Every single London Mayoral Candidate runs on the promise that they will freeze the cost of fares set by Transport for London. Then, like clockwork, the fees increase anyway, to keep up with running costs, inflation, covering the deficits left by vitriolic Government fund-slashing and to spite the London-dwelling population. If you need information on how much the fares are going to increase, you can check the Transport for London website, which this website is not, or ring the TFL head office contact number on 0843 557 3455The operatives on the other end of the phone line will be happy to help you with the fare increases and timetable for those increases to take effect.

TFL Season Tickets

TFL Season Tickets are available from any Transport for London station, office or ticket provision point, and can be ordered online or over the phone with the Transport for London head office contact number, listed on this page.

A season ticket (also sometimes called a Travelcard) allows a customer to move between designated “Zones” of the City of London, having pre-paid for their travel and will be valid for the duration of the ticket’s validity.

TFL was put together in 2000, as the direct result of the passing of the Greater London Authority Act of 1999 by the Houses of Parliament and Lords. Succeeding London Regional Transport as the authority in charge of London’s transport network, the system did not take over control of the London Underground until 2003, with the passing of the controversial “PPP” or “Public Private Partnership” deal. Before that point, the Tube had actually been the jurisdiction of the Metropolitan Police.

TFL is always chaired by the Mayor of London, and its first chairman was Ken Livingstone, who was succeeded by Boris Johnson for the role in 2008.

Deputies of TFL in this timeframe include Dave Wetzel and Daniel Moylan, appointed by their respective chairs.

Transport for London operates a centralised archive in which all of its records are protected, and as a central transport authority, these records also include the full business records of the predecessors of Transport for London, such as London Regional Transport. Earlier records and records pertaining to other authorities are held in situ at the London Metropolitan Archives by TFL on their behalf.

As the result of the 7/7 bombings in 2005, many TFL staff were awarded honours for their bravery and compassion – pulling survivors from the scenes, recovering the dead, getting the area clear for emergency services access and protecting the public as best they could. For that, they were awarded a spot on the 2006  New Year Honours List, with organisational figures such as Peter Hendy and Tim O’Toole being awarded CBEs. Other members of TFL who were distinguished in the ceremony included David Boyce, John Boyle, Peter Sanders, Alan Dell, and John Gardner, who ranked everywhere between train drivers and major management officials of the Underground, Overground, Transit and Rail systems. All of them received MBEs for their actions on 7/7.

In 2008, TFL took the unprecedented step of banning the consumption of alcohol on Tube services, Overground services, London Buses, Tram services, the Docklands Railway Service and every Transport for London Station or Outpost in operation. Stations run by other rail companies could continue to allow the consumption of alcoholic beverages if they wanted. In addition to this, the service banned individuals from carrying open containers of alcohol, but permitted the easy carriage of sealed containers like closed cans or bottles with the tops still on. The ban was proposed to promote the comfort and safety of all Tube passengers and all passengers of public transport in the Greater London Area, and does so by refusing travel to those who are in defiance of its ordinances and carrying legal weight for their expulsion from the premises. So far, it has been effective – TFL is reporting assaults on its staff decreased by 15% after the rules came into force.

The night before the new law came into effect, there was a huge party on all the Underground Lines, the “Last Round on the Underground.”

In 2014, at the centennial of the First World War, TFL celebrated its 100 Years of Women In Transport event, launched in association with Crossrail, The DfT, Network Rail, The WTS (Women’s Transportation Seminar) and Women’s Engineering Society. The campaign aims to celebrate and highlight the critically important work performed by women in the transportation industry, beginning in the First World War, when hundreds of thousands of women entered the transportation industry in order to preserve it during the staff shortages caused by enlistment and the industrial-scale slaughter of the working male population, a slaughter which was so appalling that the conflict became known as “The Great War” and “The War to End All Wars”. How wrong they were; no carnage is too great for humanity. No amount of bloodletting will ever quench man’s murderous thirst. But that’s a subject for another head office contact number page. Maybe NATO.

TFL Payment Methods

Travelcard

The Transport for London Travelcard is a multi-ethnic payment system based on the overlay of Transport for London routes, which allow customers to purchase a range of travel options, available within designated “Zones” like in a cyberpunk dystopian city, valid for any period between one day and one year, with possible alternative variants which only allow off-peak travel. The Transport for London Travelcard in all its wondrous variety is accepted on the London Underground, the Overground Railway, the Monorail, the London Bus Services, the Tram Lines, the Semi-Underground (or “Ditch”) Service, the Overhead Lines and the Gobot Network. The Transport for London Travelcard also provides a discount on a great number of River Services, like the Thames Ferries, the Thames Raft and the Thames Sludgeroller Services.

Contactless payment

Contactless payment is a bipartisan payment system based on the overlay of Transport for London routes, which allow customers to purchase a range of travel options, available within designated “Zones” like in a cyberpunk dystopian city, valid for any period between one day and one year, with possible alternative variants which only allow off-peak travel. The Transport for London Contactless Payment System in all its wondrous variety is accepted on the London Underground, the Overground Railway, the Monorail, the London Bus Services, the Tram Lines, the Semi-Underground (or “Ditch”) Service, the Overhead Lines and the Gobot Network. The Transport for London Contactless Payment System also provides a discount on a great number of River Services, like the Thames Ferries, the Thames Raft and the Thames Sludgeroller Services.

Oyster Card

TFL Trasnport For London Head Office Contact NumberThe Oyster card, specific to London transport services, allows passengers to purchase one card which can be used for transport on buses, trains, underground and overground services. The Oyster Card looks like a credit card, and is kept with you at all times. This eliminates the use of paper or card for train fairs, and its reusable uses are amazing. Once you buy an Oyster Card, you can top it up by either registering the card online in your name, or heading to any top-up kiosks. Kiosks are available at the majority of underground and overground rail services. To top up in these areas, simply touch your card to the machine, then top it up using either a credit, debit, or loose change. There is no limit to how much you can put on your Oyster Card, or how little. If you are just visiting London, Oyster is great! There is no need to keep buying different tickets, the one Oyster card will suffice on your daily travels. You can also take the Oyster Card with you as a souvenir. If you ever come back to London, your Oyster will work as normal.

TFL Strike Information

Unfortunately for the commuters of London and for the staff of the Transport for London network, the dark reality is that strikes are a common occurrence on the Transport for London lines. This often causes considerable hassle for the extremely busy and, some would say, too time-management-obsessed people of London, who never take kindly to the disruption of their carefully-worked-out travel routes.

It also causes considerable hassle for the Transport for London staff to have to live at lower levels than they feel they deserve of course and strike action is the last weapon in the arsenal of Worker’s Unions when all negotiation with their capitalist overlords fails. Thus, the unfortunate necessity of the strike.

The tragedy, then, is not in the fact that the strike has occurred unjustly, or that the strike has occurred at all (unless you are responsible for the comparatively abysmal situation in which workers find themselves) but the fact that the strikes must occur so often, imposing frequent travel issues upon the good ants in the London anthill.

If you suspect that a strike is imminent, you may want to call the Transport for London head office contact number to ask them for confirmation. Once confirmed, it would be wise to seek out their help in managing your travel options, and enquire about possible changes in the strike action over time.

If you can’t independently monitor it, you would be best to check the Transport for London head office every few hours to get updates on current activity and nonactivity.

About TFL

TFL was put together in 2000, as the direct result of the passing of the Greater London Authority Act of 1999 by the Houses of Parliament and Lords. Succeeding London Regional Transport as the authority in charge of London’s transport network, the system did not take over control of the London Underground until 2003, with the passing of the controversial “PPP” or “Public Private Partnership” deal. Before that point, the Tube had actually been the jurisdiction of the Metropolitan Police.

TFL is always chaired by the Mayor of London, and its first chairman was Ken Livingstone, who was succeeded by Boris Johnson for the role in 2008.

Deputies of TFL in this timeframe include Dave Wetzel and Daniel Moylan, appointed by their respective chairs.

Transport for London operates a centralised archive in which all of its records are protected, and as a central transport authority, these records also include the full business records of the predecessors of Transport for London, such as London Regional Transport. Earlier records and records pertaining to other authorities are held in situ at the London Metropolitan Archives by TFL on their behalf.

As the result of the 7/7 bombings in 2005, many TFL staff were awarded honours for their bravery and compassion – pulling survivors from the scenes, recovering the dead, getting the area clear for emergency services access and protecting the public as best they could. For that, they were awarded a spot on the 2006  New Year Honours List, with organisational figures such as Peter Hendy and Tim O’Toole being awarded CBEs. Other members of TFL who were distinguished in the ceremony included David Boyce, John Boyle, Peter Sanders, Alan Dell, and John Gardner, who ranked everywhere between train drivers and major management officials of the Underground, Overground, Transit and Rail systems. All of them received MBEs for their actions on 7/7.

In 2008, TFL took the unprecedented step of banning the consumption of alcohol on Tube services, Overground services, London Buses, Tram services, the Docklands Railway Service and every Transport for London Station or Outpost in operation. Stations run by other rail companies could continue to allow the consumption of alcoholic beverages if they wanted. In addition to this, the service banned individuals from carrying open containers of alcohol, but permitted the easy carriage of sealed containers like closed cans or bottles with the tops still on. The ban was proposed to promote the comfort and safety of all Tube passengers and all passengers of public transport in the Greater London Area, and does so by refusing travel to those who are in defiance of its ordinances and carrying legal weight for their expulsion from the premises. So far, it has been effective – TFL is reporting assaults on its staff decreased by 15% after the rules came into force.

The night before the new law came into effect, there was a huge party on all the Underground Lines, the “Last Round on the Underground.”

In 2014, at the centennial of the First World War, TFL celebrated its 100 Years of Women In Transport event, launched in association with Crossrail, The DfT, Network Rail, The WTS (Women’s Transportation Seminar) and Women’s Engineering Society. The campaign aims to celebrate and highlight the critically important work performed by women in the transportation industry, beginning in the First World War, when hundreds of thousands of women entered the transportation industry in order to preserve it during the staff shortages caused by enlistment and the industrial-scale slaughter of the working male population, a slaughter which was so appalling that the conflict became known as “The Great War” and “The War to End All Wars”. How wrong they were; no carnage is too great for humanity. No amount of bloodletting will ever quench man’s murderous thirst. But that’s a subject for another head office contact number page. Maybe NATO.