Met Office

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 Met Office Connection Numbers:

The Met Office Number
Met Office Head Office 0844 453 0220
Met Office Complaints 0844 453 0220
Customer services 0844 453 0220

By calling the above numbers, we can connect you to those Met Office departments. All calls to this number cost 7 pence per minute, plus your telephone network access charge. Please note we are not associated with any of the companies listed on this website. We offer a call connection service.

Met Office Opening Hours

Department Opening Hours
Head Office 24 hours a day, 7 days a week

Met Office Head Office Address

Department Head Office
Head Office Met Office
FitzRoy Road
Exeter
Devon
EX1 3PB
United Kingdom

Met Office  is a meteorological body based in the UK, providing meteorological services to the British public such as weather forecasting and the issuing of Weather Warnings.

Why would I need to call the Met Office head office contact number?

You might need to call the Met Office for any number of reasons, as it is the body concerned with reporting, forecasting and communicating weather conditions across the entire UK. Weather conditions in Britain can be extremely changeable and you may therefore need to call more than once to report a change, request more information or seek a warning.

You may also need to call:

  • To find out information about upcoming weather patterns and systems that may interfere with plans you are making
  • To report a sudden change in weather or a deviation from the forecast
  • To make further enquiries about a weather warning
  • To ask what the name of the most recent nightmare storm is
  • To enquire about forecast conditions on a specific part of Britain, for example if you were going camping or mountain climbing
  • To report extreme weather conditions that were not reported by the Met Office
  • To ask what the “Met” in “Met Office” is short for

Met Office Head Office FAQs

How do you contact the Met Office?
What is a Met Office weather warning?
Who funds the Met Office?
Met Office – why does it rain?

met-office-head-office-exeter

About the Met Office

Met Office  is a meteorological body based in the UK, providing meteorological services to the British public such as weather forecasting and the issuing of Weather Warnings. The Met Office uses satellite imagery, computer imaging and predictive modelling, weather balloons, buoys, aircraft and more traditional monitoring techniques to monitor, assess and forecast weather not just in the UK, but across the world. This way, UK citizens the world over can enjoy the security of knowing that they can predict the weather ahead of time with the most accuracy available.

Met Office Weather Forecasts

Met Office Weather Forecasts are constantly being updated, not just on the news but online and via apps. On TV, the reports will be periodically read out by the weather reporter, while online, the forecasts are updated instantaneously when new information is received, and every few minutes based on developing conditions. If you have a Met Office app, it can also be set to alert you to Weather Warnings and other developments.

Met Office London

The Met Office’s head office is in London, and can be found at the following address:

Met Office
FitzRoy Road
Exeter
Devon
EX1 3PB
United Kingdom

Met Office FAQs

How do you contact the Met Office?

Contacting the Met Office can be easily, quickly and efficiently accomplished by calling their head office on 0844 453 0220 at any time, on any day. As the weather is a matter of civil safety and influence everything we do, the Met Office must maintain open lines of communication with the public at all times. So if you are calling to report a freak lightning storm at 2am or you’re wondering what makes the rain go down at 9am on Christmas Day, you’ll be able to get in touch on this number.

The Met Office head office contact number is manned at all times by meteorological experts who can provide any information you may need on weather patterns and occurrences, forecasting and safety tips. These staff can also access the most up to date met office forecasts, providing you with minute by minute coverage of developing weather patterns and providing the most accurate forecast possible. If you’re planning a hiking trip or wondering if you should board your windows up, the Met Office phone line will be able to help you out.

What is a Met Office weather warning?

Met Office weather warnings are issued when potentially dangerous weather develops. This may take the form of extreme waves on the coast, torrential rain in areas where landslides may become a risk, deep freezes or intense heatwaves, among many, many others. When a Met Office weather warning is issued, you’ll be notified on the news or by online notification, and we advise you heed the warning. Often, it is not a reason for fear, or a reason to panic – usually, the weather warnings only exist to promote caution and prevent unnecessary risk-taking. For example, if a weather warning for severe waves has been reported, you may not need to board up your house and run for the hills – you may simply need to avoid going on that coastal walk you had planned.

Who funds the Met Office?

The Met Office is funded by the government – specifically, the Department for Business and Transport. This is because a huge part of the UK’s infrastructure, governmental operations and citizen’s safety is determined by the weather, and it is imperative that the weather prediction and forecasting services be up to scratch, so it is controlled directly as a public government service. As it is a publically funded enterprise, it is covered by the taxpayer, and must work equally for all citizens.

Met Office – why does it rain?

The Met Office explains rain in the following way – water forms pools, rivers, lakes and seas. The sun coming out makes this water begin to evaporate and go into the air as water vapour, which is invisible and makes up part of all the air. Warm air rises, carrying the water vapour up into the sky, where it forms clouds.

These clouds move across the sky with the wind, but when they get cold enough the water vapour in them turns back into liquid, forming droplets of rain which fall out of the sky. This is a rain shower, and it returns the water to the earth, where it will be heated by the sun and evaporate, beginning the entire cycle again. This is called the water cycle and is on the National Curriculum followed by all Primary Schools and nurseries in the UK, and is usually first taught to children of around 6 years old.

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